Cool projects that you have done.

Yes, it can be legal to make a silencer. For everything Form-1, from silencer designs that are easily made, to filing forms with the BATF, to 3D modeling. Remember, you must have an approved BATF Form-1 to make a silencer. All NFA laws apply.

Moderators: mpallett, bakerjw

User avatar
doubloon
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 11901
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:02 am
Location: Houston-ish

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by doubloon » Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:11 pm

Looks more like miniature artillery gear ... knobs everywhere.

I like the wood prototype in the background
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDtd2jNIwAU MUSAFAR!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CrOL-ydFMI This is Water DavidW
Complete Form 1s http://www.silencertalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=79895

User avatar
daviscustom
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 924
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 5:40 pm
Location: Fly-over Country

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by daviscustom » Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:31 pm

Historian wrote:Daviscustom, masterful execution of edged blades!
Blade man personified. My admiration.

I hope others can appreciate the extent of your skills and design sense,
such as in the 'wire wrap' handle,
the perfect balance between the handle, guard, blade, etc.

In particular the underplayed 'broad blade', classic.

You might find images of the late Tom Clinton knives
intriguing. [ e.g., Mine with desert ironwood handle. ]
He was author of "Knives of the U.S. Special Forces".

<< http://www.google.com/search?q=Images+T ... 38&bih=991 >>

Most impressive. Thank you for the visual treat.

Best.

Thank you.....and thanks for the link, I do like his broad double edge blades....hadn't seen those before. Have always been a fan of the classic Randall's.

Baffled....beautiful work, really like the 22 machine gun....I've always wanted to build one of the 22lr gatling guns. Any video of it in action?....it really needs a can on it....or an integral.....could be made to look like a water jacket around the barrel. It is VERY cool the way it is, I just don't like shooting loud guns anymore, earplugs suck.

flat tire....well done, very nice gesture....has a very natural feel.
The myopic majority will be our republic's undoing.

User avatar
MCKNBRD
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 356
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:19 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by MCKNBRD » Thu Jan 23, 2014 10:25 am

JohnK454 wrote:Very nice stuff posted so far!

My latest is a shameless copy of Tom Lipton's (Oxtools on YouTube) mini pallet system. Just finished it today - should be very handy. The actual pallet is 6"x8"x2.5" aluminum with 75 10-32 tapped holes on 1" centers. Fits in the mill vise. Made a quick jig to speed up beveling the nose of the clamps.

The last two pics are a junker Ruger barrel clamped just to show concept.

Image

Image

Image
I'll just go ahead and warn you that I'm going to copy the heck outta that once I get my mill set up. I don't have a lot of room for vises and such, so this pallet would be a dream come true for flexibility in setup.

Why 2.5" thick material, though? I'd imagine that I could clamp it straight to my table and be fine with 1" thick stuff...right? Unless I can talk a buddy out of some thick scrap material, its gonna be 'spensive to get stock that thick. Did you use 6061?

Byrdman

JohnK454
Member
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:55 pm
Location: Lower Alabama

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by JohnK454 » Thu Jan 23, 2014 11:12 am

Actually, 1" stock would be better. I used the thick chunk because it had been in my scrap pile for nearly 20yrs, so it was "free". No idea what grade, but I would guess 6061. It can be considered sacrificial - if dinged, just re-surface and keep going. Another plus for the 1" stock is the holes will go all the way through and won't trap coolant.

Here's a link to Tom's blog writeup:

http://oxtool.blogspot.com/2012/12/chri ... nists.html

If you watch his videos, he uses his mini pallet all the time for small/hard to clamp work. Very useful.

Grounded
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 228
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:44 am
Location: US of A

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Grounded » Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:31 am

JohnK454 wrote:Actually, 1" stock would be better. I used the thick chunk because it had been in my scrap pile for nearly 20yrs, so it was "free". No idea what grade, but I would guess 6061. It can be considered sacrificial - if dinged, just re-surface and keep going. Another plus for the 1" stock is the holes will go all the way through and won't trap coolant.

Here's a link to Tom's blog writeup:

http://oxtool.blogspot.com/2012/12/chri ... nists.html

If you watch his videos, he uses his mini pallet all the time for small/hard to clamp work. Very useful.
I used 6061 plates and mic-6 plates a lot in my previous line of work and with thickness of 3/4-1.25" we still saw deflection when mounting some dies. I would go with 1.5" and buy MIC-6 Cast since its usually flat (spec is +/-.005 but we typically saw +/-.001") upon arrival.
07/02 behind enemy lines

JohnK454
Member
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:55 pm
Location: Lower Alabama

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by JohnK454 » Fri Jan 24, 2014 11:28 am

Grounded wrote:
JohnK454 wrote:Actually, 1" stock would be better. I used the thick chunk because it had been in my scrap pile for nearly 20yrs, so it was "free". No idea what grade, but I would guess 6061. It can be considered sacrificial - if dinged, just re-surface and keep going. Another plus for the 1" stock is the holes will go all the way through and won't trap coolant.

Here's a link to Tom's blog writeup:

http://oxtool.blogspot.com/2012/12/chri ... nists.html

If you watch his videos, he uses his mini pallet all the time for small/hard to clamp work. Very useful.
I used 6061 plates and mic-6 plates a lot in my previous line of work and with thickness of 3/4-1.25" we still saw deflection when mounting some dies. I would go with 1.5" and buy MIC-6 Cast since its usually flat (spec is +/-.005 but we typically saw +/-.001") upon arrival.
Grounded, what size clamping screws and torque caused deflection on a 1" plate? This application will use perhaps (4) 10-32 screws on a roughly 6"x6"x1" plate for small jobs.

User avatar
Baffled
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 4:20 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Baffled » Fri Jan 24, 2014 11:41 am

My first posting here was one of those (moderately buzzed on scotch) where, afterwards, you kind of cringe inside... :oops: "Why did I do that?" but the way that thread was going really hacked me; the snide insinuation that we're nothing but a bunch of no-talent armchair types. We all share a common interest in suppressors, many of us have machine tools, and the combined talent of the regulars here is exceptionally high.

I want to go back and look more closely - There is some incredible work on display here.

When I was 16 or so, I desperately wanted a .22, but my parents said "no", so I mail-ordered an 1851 Navy revolver, made my own BP, cast bullets, and had a blast. That led me into muzzleloaders in general, especially the flintlocks:

Image

I found I enjoyed working with the metal components more than the wood; bought a lathe, and never looked back. People ask me "What do you do for fun? Golf?" and my reply always puzzles them. "I have a small machine shop." They always ask "What do you make?"

"Anything. Here's the deal... when you have a lathe and a mill, there's very little you can't make. If you cannot make it directly, you can make the tool that can do the job."

It's a hugely rewarding hobby.

------------------------------------

Edit: After going back and looking at the work, I am in awe of what we have here. We have CNC gurus, casting experts, guys that love tooling as much as me... luthiers (is that what it's called?), some EXPERT knife makers, incredible welding, and a compound pharmacist! <-- Much respect, I have a chemistry degree and I know what goes into getting that sort of education and skill.

SilencerKid, hopefully we can get along. The gas gennie in the turboprop was a quick-build job, but I had previously built a thrust MW-54 from scratch. AFAIK, Wren is still in the UK. When Mike published his turboprop plans, I jumped on them, and really cranked that thing out. I do believe it was the first one to run this side of the Atlantic.

Grounded
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 228
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:44 am
Location: US of A

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Grounded » Fri Jan 24, 2014 11:56 am

JohnK454 wrote:
Grounded wrote:
JohnK454 wrote:Actually, 1" stock would be better. I used the thick chunk because it had been in my scrap pile for nearly 20yrs, so it was "free". No idea what grade, but I would guess 6061. It can be considered sacrificial - if dinged, just re-surface and keep going. Another plus for the 1" stock is the holes will go all the way through and won't trap coolant.

Here's a link to Tom's blog writeup:

http://oxtool.blogspot.com/2012/12/chri ... nists.html

If you watch his videos, he uses his mini pallet all the time for small/hard to clamp work. Very useful.
I used 6061 plates and mic-6 plates a lot in my previous line of work and with thickness of 3/4-1.25" we still saw deflection when mounting some dies. I would go with 1.5" and buy MIC-6 Cast since its usually flat (spec is +/-.005 but we typically saw +/-.001") upon arrival.
Grounded, what size clamping screws and torque caused deflection on a 1" plate? This application will use perhaps (4) 10-32 screws on a roughly 6"x6"x1" plate for small jobs.
Many many many #8-32's being used to hold down ampco and steel tooling. The application was RF welding of 1 mil materials so deflection was critical.
07/02 behind enemy lines

300sniper
Silent Operator
Posts: 76
Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2013 10:53 am
Location: Greenwood, Ca

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by 300sniper » Fri Jan 24, 2014 12:05 pm

Grounded wrote:
I used 6061 plates and mic-6 plates a lot in my previous line of work and with thickness of 3/4-1.25" we still saw deflection when mounting some dies. I would go with 1.5" and buy MIC-6 Cast since its usually flat (spec is +/-.005 but we typically saw +/-.001") upon arrival.

MIC-6 is good stuff. I buy rems from a local supplier and use it quite a bit for tooling plates.
It's time to switch to whiskey, we've been drinkin' beer all night.

User avatar
bakerjw
Elite Member
Posts: 3611
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:13 am
Location: NE Tenn.

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by bakerjw » Sat Jan 25, 2014 12:08 am

Baffled wrote:when you have a lathe and a mill, there's very little you can't make.
QFT +1000

A few years back I lost a bolt that held a dual pulley onto my general use lawn tractor. I had one a bit larger so I chucked it up in the lathe. Dialed it in, turned it down and threaded it. It took about 15 minutes. You can truly do almost anything with those 2 tools. A welder and air compressor thrown into the mix helps too, but those are terribly common tools in most shops.
July 5th, 2016. The day that we moved from a soft tyranny to a hard tyranny.

User avatar
daviscustom
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 924
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 5:40 pm
Location: Fly-over Country

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by daviscustom » Sat Jan 25, 2014 9:54 am

Baffled wrote:
When I was 16 or so, I desperately wanted a .22, but my parents said "no", so I mail-ordered an 1851 Navy revolver, made my own BP, cast bullets, and had a blast. That led me into muzzleloaders in general, especially the flintlocks:

Image

I found I enjoyed working with the metal components more than the wood; bought a lathe, and never looked back. .
So you built the flintlock I assume? Beautiful rifle. That is something I have always wanted to do......think it would look odd to make it an integral? :mrgreen: I think it would be fun to do a steampunk kinda "high tech" integral.

Been thinking a lot about Black Powder and Air rifles, hushed of course.......no government meddling......yet.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/3637622/Casel ... machinegun
The myopic majority will be our republic's undoing.

User avatar
daviscustom
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 924
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 5:40 pm
Location: Fly-over Country

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by daviscustom » Sat Jan 25, 2014 10:09 am

bakerjw wrote:
Baffled wrote:when you have a lathe and a mill, there's very little you can't make.
QFT +1000

A few years back I lost a bolt that held a dual pulley onto my general use lawn tractor. I had one a bit larger so I chucked it up in the lathe. Dialed it in, turned it down and threaded it. It took about 15 minutes. You can truly do almost anything with those 2 tools. A welder and air compressor thrown into the mix helps too, but those are terribly common tools in most shops.

That is why I got interested in machine work.....it was the final piece of the puzzle to be able to make ANYTHING my little heart desires. I grew up on a farm, if you can't afford it, figure out how to make it!
The myopic majority will be our republic's undoing.

airsix
Member
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:39 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by airsix » Sat Jan 25, 2014 1:52 pm

I'm still an engineering and fabrication hobby neophyte (I work in business).

Sometimes I make this

Image


Out of this:
Image

The blade pivot runs on a bronze bushing I turned pivot hole is reamed and barrel lapped. Whole assembly is held together with dowel pins drilled and tapped, clamping the bushings with 0.0005" clearance for the blade to pivot. Things have to be surface ground pretty well to pivot smoothly when it's that tight in there. ; )

Blade ground and heat treated on machines I built from scratch*

*except the surface grinder. That I rebuilt from a scrapped old quality commercial model.

Historian
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 3305
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 11:37 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Historian » Sat Jan 25, 2014 2:20 pm

airsix wrote:I'm still an engineering and fabrication hobby neophyte (I work in business).

Sometimes I make this

Image


Out of this:
Image

The blade pivot runs on a bronze bushing I turned pivot hole is reamed and barrel lapped. Whole assembly is held together with dowel pins drilled and tapped, clamping the bushings with 0.0005" clearance for the blade to pivot. Things have to be surface ground pretty well to pivot smoothly when it's that tight in there. ; )

Blade ground and heat treated on machines I built from scratch*

*except the surface grinder. That I rebuilt from a scrapped old quality commercial model.
Wheeeeeeeeeeeew!! Beauuuutifulllll! :)

If I collected folders I would be beating a path to your door
to avail myself of your compelling design and execution.

In keeping with the theme of this site I once saw OCONUS in the '60s a folder
with an interesting feature:

It was fatter; the blade came out;
then a short .22 barrel pivoted out .. ~ 2"; .22 slipped in; barrel pushed down cocking
the 'knife'; and side button fired it. I joked at the designer that the only thing
missing was a suppressor. In a nearly perfect Eaton accent he laughed that he
might consider at some future date adding one.

A Braverman Stinger that would fit into a Randall #18. ???? :)

Again my sincerest compliments!


Best.

User avatar
delta9mda
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 2304
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 4:32 pm
Location: miami, florida

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by delta9mda » Sat Jan 25, 2014 4:15 pm

there is some masterful metal (and wood) manipulation here. wow.
NP

a_canadian
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 1172
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2013 4:09 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by a_canadian » Sat Jan 25, 2014 5:35 pm

shithead_kid wrote: hey now, like i said, not mine, i would have gone with the more expensive green tape or possibly a duct tape.

i am checking out my next firearm to add to my large collection, so bug off
Impossible. You're just such a festering sore of a human being, it's impossible not to be bothered by your bullshit. Your contributions to this forum have so far been 100% negative. A real gem of a human being.

User avatar
WhisperFan
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 1550
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:08 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by WhisperFan » Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:33 pm

doubloon wrote:Looks more like miniature artillery gear ... knobs everywhere.

I like the wood prototype in the background
This is a rimfire benchrest I am making. You can see a wood mock-up on the bench here too. I like working things out in wood before I start making metal parts.

Image

Image

Image

I always laugh when I hear someone say that they want to buy a lathe to build a suppressor, thinking they can just buy the lathe and the materials and start making the suppressor. I probably have 2xs the cost of my lathe in tooling and measuring, set-up, and lay-out tools. :D
As nightfall does not come all at once, neither does oppression. In both instances, there is a twilight when everything remains seemingly unchanged. And it is in such a twilight that we all must be aware of change in the air -- however slight -- lest we become unwilling victims of the darkness.
Justice William O. Douglas

User avatar
bakerjw
Elite Member
Posts: 3611
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:13 am
Location: NE Tenn.

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by bakerjw » Mon Jan 27, 2014 7:02 am

I haven't asked Robert to ban anyone since the Leonard days, and that took a while even after Leonard threatened me. But now I am darn close.
Cool the crap and just get along. I created this thread because some people were interested in seeing other people's work only to see it get eventually derailed.
July 5th, 2016. The day that we moved from a soft tyranny to a hard tyranny.

User avatar
Dr.K
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 632
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2007 9:32 pm
Location: Webster Parish

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Dr.K » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:26 pm

bakerjw wrote:I haven't asked Robert to ban anyone since the Leonard days, and that took a while even after Leonard threatened me. But now I am darn close.
Cool the crap and just get along. I created this thread because some people were interested in seeing other people's work only to see it get eventually derailed.
Thank you. That guys post was like a turd in the punchbowl, that is to say a really awesome delicious bowl of punch that I was enjoying until then.
Kyle O.

Historian
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 3305
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 11:37 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Historian » Mon Jan 27, 2014 2:05 pm

Dr.K wrote:
bakerjw wrote:I haven't asked Robert to ban anyone since the Leonard days, and that took a while even after Leonard threatened me. But now I am darn close.
Cool the crap and just get along. I created this thread because some people were interested in seeing other people's work only to see it get eventually derailed.
Thank you. That guys post was like a turd in the punchbowl, that is to say a really awesome delicious bowl of punch that I was enjoying until then.
Ernest Hemingway could not have penned it better or more effectively!

The brethren here do not deserve non-productive, intended to harm,
disruptive, energy dissipating, and sadly pitiful expressions of ill breeding.

Just my .02 £ ( inflation )

User avatar
Baffled
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 4:20 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Baffled » Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:36 am

WhisperFan wrote:
doubloon wrote:Looks more like miniature artillery gear ... knobs everywhere.

I like the wood prototype in the background
This is a rimfire benchrest I am making. You can see a wood mock-up on the bench here too. I like working things out in wood before I start making metal parts.


Image

I always laugh when I hear someone say that they want to buy a lathe to build a suppressor, thinking they can just buy the lathe and the materials and start making the suppressor. I probably have 2xs the cost of my lathe in tooling and measuring, set-up, and lay-out tools. :D
That workbench resembles my own, and just about every machinist out there! Nice work.

Mic-6 plate is REALLY good stuff when you need accurate aluminum plate.

Image

When I built my little CNC bench mill, I found that standard 6061 plate would vary +/- 0.005" or more, and the only way to get a flat surface out of it was to face mill it. Then I found the mic-6 stuff, and it machined beautifully, and best of all, was flat out of the box.

Any time a guy needs a truly flat 2D surface for a jig or fixture or bit of tooling, and aluminum is OK or desired, go mic-6.

WhisperFan, your beautiful bench rests remind me of the sort of construction that goes into a home tool & cutter grinder - you've got some very high quality hardware in there, nicely executed. Can you explain exactly what these are for? I think "Pile of sand bags" when I hear "bench rest." Is the idea to lock the rifle in place with total rigidity?

User avatar
sub-sonic
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 780
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:16 pm
Location: pacific ocean

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by sub-sonic » Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:07 pm

I only have a little dick
Image

Image

Image
I have two hobbies. Shooting and reloading. The more I do of one the more I can do of the other.

User avatar
WhisperFan
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 1550
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:08 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by WhisperFan » Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:47 pm

Baffled wrote:WhisperFan, your beautiful bench rests remind me of the sort of construction that goes into a home tool & cutter grinder - you've got some very high quality hardware in there, nicely executed. Can you explain exactly what these are for? I think "Pile of sand bags" when I hear "bench rest." Is the idea to lock the rifle in place with total rigidity?
The shooter that wanted these had some pretty specific needs, like many rests, they wanted the rest to move up and down (elevation) and left to right (windage) They wanted these adjustments to 'lock' in place once adjusted. They wanted the 'fences' that hold the rifle foreend to adjust to accomodate different widths.

They wanted the cradle to twist left to right and tilt (when viewed from the side)

The rifle, when picked straight up, has to come up from the rest. The idea is that the rifle will recoil back after the shot, and the shooter pushes the rifle back forward till it hits the stop, and it is back on target. I don't think the rules allow the rifle to be clamped to the rest (and depending on caliber - you could never prevent movement anyway) :wink:
As nightfall does not come all at once, neither does oppression. In both instances, there is a twilight when everything remains seemingly unchanged. And it is in such a twilight that we all must be aware of change in the air -- however slight -- lest we become unwilling victims of the darkness.
Justice William O. Douglas

User avatar
Baffled
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 4:20 pm

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by Baffled » Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:54 pm

Thanks, that makes sense. There's something fascinating about extreme hardware (barrels, actions, fixtures, etc) that take the man somewhat out of the equation, and all that's going on is perfection of the hardware and ammo. Like an 03-A3 barreled action clamped in a massive iron fixture, with the idea being to punch one hole downrange.
Baffled....beautiful work, really like the 22 machine gun....I've always wanted to build one of the 22lr gatling guns. Any video of it in action?....it really needs a can on it....or an integral.....could be made to look like a water jacket around the barrel. It is VERY cool the way it is, I just don't like shooting loud guns anymore, earplugs suck.
First, I need to say, your bladed weapons are magnificent. I have a vague idea of what it takes to produce something like that. I did one knife a while back, and it didn't turn out too good.

For the little MG, I created a number of shrouds that look different. The heart of this thing is Lakeside's LM-7, an AR upper, and it's threaded to accept any AR guard.

Image

A standard aluminum AR hand guard looks a lot like a Maxim or 1917 water jacket. When I took these pics, I was messing around with various "looks" - you can tell I like the conical flash hider. But for sights, in the end, I went with a very simple post front, and the rear is a modified Winchester Model 52 ladder sight.

Image

Image

It'll take any suppressor with a standard thread. The barrels are quick detach, and it'd be very simple to create an integral. The entire barrel plus can would pop right off with the push of a button. But I want to ensure function first without a suppressor.

I need to get going and finish this thing. My shop is completely NON-climate controlled, so work slows down in winter and summer - temps in the summer top 130 degrees in there. It's awful.

Sub-sonic - tell me more about what you are doing there... look like you are boring out and modifying berdan cartridges for boxer. What is that round?

User avatar
tylermtech
Silent But Deadly
Posts: 698
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 9:21 pm
Location: Huffman, TX

Re: Cool projects that you have done.

Post by tylermtech » Mon Feb 10, 2014 7:25 pm

It's not metal, but I made it


Image

Image

Image

Post Reply