Practice material

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JensonStorm
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Practice material

Post by JensonStorm » Sun Mar 01, 2020 9:07 pm

Long time voyeur first time poster.

Got a 8x14 HF lathe. Practiced some threading, turning...

What kind of material would you suggest practicing with? Materials that would be similar in machining characteristics to say 17-4 and grade 9 titanium.

Or do I have to practice 1.5 24tph ID and OD on these exotics?

Thanks,

Jenson

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fishman
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Re: Practice material

Post by fishman » Sun Mar 01, 2020 10:47 pm

Why bother practicing? Jump right in to trying to make titanium parts. That's how I learned to use a lathe.
300 blackout form 1: http://www.silencertalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=137293

5.56 form 1:
http://www.silencertalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=141800&p=955647#p955647

#40Fan
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Re: Practice material

Post by #40Fan » Sun Mar 01, 2020 11:55 pm

Get some cheap 6061 round bar and have some fun. Won't be anything like 17-4 or Ti, but you'll get the jist of threading, turning, boring and everything else that goes with the process and only risk pennies on the dollar.

When it comes down to the real thing, go slow and check your work frequently. Keep tools sharp. Don't cut yourself with the 17-4 and don't start a fire with the Ti. Make a cut, remove the chips/bird nest for both materials. Repeat.

When I say remove....get them completely out of the area.

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T-Rex
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Re: Practice material

Post by T-Rex » Mon Mar 02, 2020 11:14 am

get drops of 17-4. It's hardly expensive and usually cheaper than the typical materials recommended for learning (12L14).

Practice sharpening HSS tool bits. Good, sharp, HSS bits will cut just about any material you're going to turn, on your hobby lathe.
Completed Builds www.silencertalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=79895
Burst Calculator www.engineersedge.com/calculators/pipe_bust_calc.htm
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Historian
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Re: Practice material

Post by Historian » Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:17 pm

Something you might consider is using DELRIN (Acetal Homopolymers) rod, e.g., 1.25" Diameter
for practicing techniques, prototyping, and modeling.

If your goal is to cut say a 1.024" thread on an aluminum
7075 rod, first mirroring each step in the process with Delrin will expose
problems with threading tool shape, tool height, depth of
cut (e.g., .024" for 28TPI ), alignment, etc.

Like the old funny sign in ancient machine shop:
" Wasn't it 'cut twice' and measure once??" :)

Delrin also makes a great thread protector, etc.

Just a thought.


Best.

JensonStorm
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Re: Practice material

Post by JensonStorm » Mon Mar 02, 2020 8:26 pm

Great advice!

Thank you.

Jenson

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Re: Practice material

Post by ECCO Machine » Tue Mar 03, 2020 3:02 am

T-Rex wrote:
Mon Mar 02, 2020 11:14 am
get drops of 17-4. It's hardly expensive and usually cheaper than the typical materials recommended for learning (12L14).
This.

You can't really "practice" with materials that have vastly different mechanical & thermal properties from what you'll be using, especially on a wiggly little benchtop machine. Ti tube and 17-4 bar behave nothing like aluminum or carbon steels, polymers or other materials. You can set everything up exactly the same for one of those as you did with 6061 Al or A36 steel and you'll get very different results. Work piece and tool deflection, heat build up, chatter-inducing harmonics-none of it will be the same. Even on my 4,500 lb industrial lathe, I can cut threads perfectly to spec on a piece of aluminum, but switch to 17-4 or Ti, I'll have to go deeper, sometimes progressively (move cutter further into the work during the thread cut).
FFL07/02SOT Gunsmith & Machinist

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Capt. Link.
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Re: Practice material

Post by Capt. Link. » Tue Mar 03, 2020 4:52 pm

You will need accessories for the mini lathe. A steady rest will be needed and is easy to build.4140 carbon steel is a good choice as you can get plate and round stock. A tailstock drilling plate is great if you don't have a drill press.You can also build these into a dividing head of sorts.Many small projects to practice on.Here is web page to get you started http://bedair.org/9x20camlock/9x20project.html.
I would encourage you and others to learn to grind your own tool bits.A slow speed grinder with a wide wheel is about a 100$ and the skill of making your own will pay off in a lifetime of benefits.
Best -CL
The only reason after 243 years the government now wants to disarm you is they intend to do something you would shoot them for!

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Re: Practice material

Post by Historian » Wed Mar 04, 2020 5:31 pm

The Good Captain's astute advice should be taken seriously.

May I add to the list a na easy to build a tool I have found very useful
more times than I can count: A Lathe Hand Crank

<< http://www.bazmonaut.com/machines/hobby ... threading/ >>

<< https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxzMxOtx4gs >>

<< https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zS70SMY6U-Q >>

p.s., Steve Jordan is a charming British machinist who shares
his skills so freely. A cornucopia of knowledge. He is from
the 'clan' that brought us the Newtonian Mechanics, calculus, Welrod,
Spitfire, Radar, etc.

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