New European Designs

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Historian
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New European Designs

Post by Historian » Tue Dec 11, 2018 5:55 pm


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Capt. Link.
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Re: New European Designs

Post by Capt. Link. » Tue Dec 11, 2018 8:17 pm

The use of woven rope and spring like diffusion material is rather unique in centerfire design.The use of the rope will allow for a high degree of packing density which is desirable.If anyone wants to find woven metal rope look for electrical grounding strap.Silver or tin plated copper may make a very good packing material and the spring ones are no less than genius level to cause diffusion in high pressure areas.
I feel like its 1980 again and was learning about Charles Finn and the slanted sidewall for the first time.Many small improvements have been introduced recently that may add up to smaller better suppressors.The future looks bright let the chips fly!!


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You tell me if this is a rerun of a 1940s classic.

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VS

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-CL
The only reason after 243 years the government now wants to disarm you is they intend to do something you would shoot them for!

Historian
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Re: New European Designs

Post by Historian » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:34 pm

The good Captain's encyclopedic knowledge never
ceases to amaze me!

If one rifles through 1940's suppressor patents
the Holy-Helical Suppressor design was used in the past
as the funny Arte Johnson German Character
can attest. :)

Kudos, Sir!

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John A.
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Re: New European Designs

Post by John A. » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:50 pm

I appreciate you guys that have a wealth of historical knowledge like this.

I often find myself trying to scour the internet to find gems such as this.

And now, I'm going to humbly ask, what was the 1940 classic on? A suppressed MP40? I know the Germans did make some, but I was under the impression that (at least one version) used bakelite baffles, rather than machined baffles, which the above appears to be machined.
I don't care what your chart says

quiettime
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Re: New European Designs

Post by quiettime » Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:55 am

John A. wrote: And now, I'm going to humbly ask, what was the 1940 classic on? A suppressed MP40? I know the Germans did make some, but I was under the impression that (at least one version) used bakelite baffles, rather than machined baffles, which the above appears to be machined.
I believe that can was for a 98 Mauser.

Capt Link, I feel like you're poking fun at the "advances" in technology by the Euros...

Historian
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Re: New European Designs

Post by Historian » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:48 am

quiettime wrote:
John A. wrote: And now, I'm going to humbly ask, what was the 1940 classic on? A suppressed MP40? I know the Germans did make some, but I was under the impression that (at least one version) used bakelite baffles, rather than machined baffles, which the above appears to be machined.
I believe that can was for a 98 Mauser.

Capt Link, I feel like you're poking fun at the "advances" in technology by the Euros...
Au Contraire, mon Ami.

Quite the opposite. He is pointing out, in the vein of the History
Channel program Weaponology which traces weapon evolution,
the importance of knowing all previous attempts, successes,
and failures.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la meme chose.

Rarest can was for an FG42 ... a most advanced weapon design for
Otto Skorzeny's* Fallschirmjäger. Having a filter set for its scope
is the Unicorn of militaria for a collector.

WIKI- "The FG 42 (German: Fallschirmjägergewehr 42,
"paratrooper rifle 42") is a selective-fire automatic rifle[1][2]
produced in Nazi Germany during World War II.
The weapon was developed specifically for the use
of the Fallschirmjäger airborne infantry in 1942
and was used in very limited numbers until the end of the war."

* Skorzeny's evil virulent anti-Semitism lead to his 'consulting'
in Egypt and laid the base for the Middle-East terrorism of today.

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Capt. Link.
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Re: New European Designs

Post by Capt. Link. » Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:21 pm

John A. wrote:I appreciate you guys that have a wealth of historical knowledge like this.

I often find myself trying to scour the internet to find gems such as this.

And now, I'm going to humbly ask, what was the 1940 classic on? A suppressed MP40? I know the Germans did make some, but I was under the impression that (at least one version) used bakelite baffles, rather than machined baffles, which the above appears to be machined.
I can't find a picture of the MP40 suppressor. Its a fairly sophisticated spiral coaxial design.I do not know of Bakelite ever being used in suppressor construction.The pictured suppressor is for the 98 to the best of my knowledge.

quiettime :
I honestly avoided any discussion on EU advances.....
I did find the use of packing material novel and interesting. A spring unlike standard heat adsorbing packing would create a huge amount of turbulence without the tendency to fill with carbon or be blown apart by high heat and pressure.Its a very simple way of introducing a complex shape where one is needed.It makes me rethink designs of the past just like the EU manufacture's have in their new designs.

-CL
The only reason after 243 years the government now wants to disarm you is they intend to do something you would shoot them for!

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John A.
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Re: New European Designs

Post by John A. » Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:44 pm

Capt. Link. wrote: I can't find a picture of the MP40 suppressor. Its a fairly sophisticated spiral coaxial design.I do not know of Bakelite ever being used in suppressor construction.The pictured suppressor is for the 98 to the best of my knowledge.
I'll see if I can find some historical pictures. I know that I've seen them, but may take some digging to find them.

here's one but I don't take any credit for any of the pictures. They're found in a google search, which as we all know is only as accurate as the information that is input into it.
---------------------

Posted March 26, 2017

Mp-40 Suppressor L41 (Arado - Brandenburg):

cylinder diameter 43 mm

length 295 mm

weight 0,7 kg

Mp-40 Suppressor L42 (Schneider/Opel - Berlin):

cylinder diameter 45 mm

length 350 mm

weight 0,6 kg

[notice how there are multiple parts]

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I don't care what your chart says

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Wile_E_Coyote
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Re: New European Designs

Post by Wile_E_Coyote » Thu Dec 20, 2018 5:48 pm

The old Sionic suppresors used with the M10 and M11 had a helical portion as well I believe. That and a stage that was filled with what looked like shoe string eyelets.

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